Press Releases

  1. September 28, 2006
    September 28, 2006, ANN ARBOR, Mich--- A new finding from the laboratory of Stephen Weiss at the University of Michigan provides important insights into cancer cells’ most deadly characteristic -- their ability to invade tissues and metastasize throughout the body. When cancers are discovered and treated before they spread, the likelihood of cure is much greater. 
  2. September 25, 2006
    September 25, 2006, ANN ARBOR, Mich.---The Life Sciences Institute (LSI) at the University of Michigan has hired five new faculty members, bringing the total faculty in the multidisciplinary research institute to 25. The latest LSI recruits include two new researchers for the U-M Center for Stem Cell Biology, two chemists and a geneticist. Three of the five are women.
  3. September 8, 2006
    Turning Off A Tumor Signal ANN ARBOR, Mich.— The discovery of new cellular machinery leading to tumor cell growth in colorectal cancers points to a possible treatment. Researchers at the Life Sciences Institute at the University of Michigan report in a study published September 8 in the journal Cell that a signaling factor important in cell growth also may play a role in turning normal cells into tumors.
  4. September 7, 2006
    September 7, 2006 Ann Arbor, Mich. and Minneapolis, Minn. -- When infections like Strep and tuberculosis become resistant to antibiotics, patients are in trouble. Infections become more difficult to treat as disease-causing bugs mutate in ways that render the most widely used drugs ineffective. Nearly all significant bacterial infections in the world are becoming resistant to the most commonly prescribed antibiotic treatments. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control has called antibiotic resistance one of the world’s most pressing public health problems.
  5. September 7, 2006
    Ringing in New Antibiotic Drugs Ann Arbor, Mich. and Minneapolis, Minn. -- When infections like Strep and tuberculosis become resistant to antibiotics, patients are in trouble. Infections become more difficult to treat as disease-causing bugs mutate in ways that render the most widely used drugs ineffective. Nearly all significant bacterial infections in the world are becoming resistant to the most commonly prescribed antibiotic treatments. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control has called antibiotic resistance one of the world’s most pressing public health problems.
  6. September 1, 2006
    Older Stem Cells Don't Just Wear Out, They Actively Shut Themselves Down Sept. 1, 2006, ANN ARBOR, Mich.---The natural consequences of growing old include slower wound-healing and a brain that makes fewer new neurons because old tissues have less regenerative capacity. What has not been clear is why. A trio of papers published on-line Sept. 6 in the journal Nature shows that old stem cells don't simply wear out, they actively shut themselves down, probably as a defense against becoming cancerous from genetic defects that accumulate with age.
  7. June 1, 2006
    U-M Biologist Wins Howard Hughes Medical Institute Teaching Grant
  8. May 25, 2006
    Michigan team singles out cancer stem cells for attack
  9. March 18, 2006
    Dr. Sean Morrison Brings Promise and Enthusiasm to U-M Stem Cell Research March 18, 2006, ANN ARBOR, Michigan – “A scientist is like a storyteller,” says Sean Morrison, director of the University of Michigan’s Center for Stem Cell Biology. “It’s exciting to discover a good story and be able to tell people about it.”
  10. February 22, 2006
    Rosenberg and Xu Receive Prestigious Fellowship

Pages